In Northern India, lies a notoriously polluted river that is often described as one of the worst in the world. The Yamuna river flows through the populous New Delhi and is filled with up to 58% of the waste from the city.

Vimlendu Jha sought to change this environmental nightmare and created a movement to clean the Yamuna by encouraging youth to make a difference. Vimlendu soon found that there were more environmental issues to be addressed and from this initial scheme came “Green the Gap.”

Green the Gap was started as a way to give waste another life and focuses on upcycling old materials. By designing and creating products that consumers want, Green the Gap are able to remove the stigma associated with products made from waste. Purchasing their materials from rag-pickers and waste markets, they soon transform old tyres, juice cartons and waste fabrics into beautifully designed products.

We now stock trendy satchels and bags in our Global Handicrafts store which promotes both sustainability by reusing old tyres and provides employment opportunities to the locals. The new found livelihood for the employees involves fair pay and opportunities to learn new skills. Many of their workers have come from disadvantaged backgrounds and by working at Green the Gap, their entire standard of living has improved.

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