Yau has not always lived in a world of darkness. When she was 9 years old, Yau developed glaucoma and cataracts and by 14, she was completely blind. She finished just three years of secondary school. The future can be uncertain for Hong Kong’s blind and visually impaired. While there are wonderful resources available, many still find themselves unable to get a secure job, and fall into depression or reliance on government support to survive.

“Since I was so young when I left school,” Yau reflected, “I didn’t think about a career path. However, I felt that I had a good sense of touch, and my class teacher encouraged me to take a job at the Factory for the Blind.” It was this opportunity that began Yau’s success story as a sewing worker with the Hong Kong Society for the Blind’s Factory for the Blind. Yau and her co-workers are employed to create clothing, bags and other items that are sold to clients all over Hong Kong.

“I am very grateful to have found a job in Hong Kong, and be given the opportunity to rely on myself,” says Yau. We at Global Handicrafts are grateful, too, to be part of her story, selling several items from the Society for the Blind in our store, with their fabulous stripey fabric tote bags available online!

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